• The Greater Bird of Paradise was introduced unto Little Tobago island in 1909 from their native  Aru Islands New Guinea home in an effort to protect the species from over-hunting.  The species was unable to permanently populate the island and the last confirmed sighting was in 1981.
  • The national birds are the Scarlet Ibis resident in Trinidad and the Rufus-vented Chachalaca (Cocrico) resident in Tobago.
  • The Oilbird is the only nocturnal fruit eating bird in the world, living exclusively in caves and ranging only in Trinidad and some remote parts of northern South America.
  • The Tufted Coquette and Rufus-shafted Woodstar Hummingbirds both measure as the smallest birds in the country with a size of 7cm.
  • The Jabiru Stork is the largest bird recorded in the country with a length of 132cm and wing span of 240cm.
  • The Lipkin and the Oilbird are the only two native birds which are the only members of their respective families.
  • There are over 100 species of mammals recorded in the country; of these approximately 70 species are bats..
  • Tobago has in excess of 210 recorded bird species, of these 22 species are not found in Trinidad.
  • There are only four mortally venomous snakes in the Country, occurring only in Trinidad.  These are two species of Corals and two species of Pit Vipers. 
  • Birds (Avifauna) is the largest group of vertebrate existing in the country, with 74 families being represented.
  • There are only two endemic birds in the country.  The Trinidad Pipping Guan found in Trinidad and the Trinidad Mot Mot which is found on both islands.
  • Trinidad & Tobago geologically are continental islands; being former parts of the South American Mainland, and are Eastward extensions of the South American Andes with Tobago nestled on the extreme of the Continental shelf.   
  • Trinidad & Tobago is the most densely populated country in the world for birds, with over 470 recorded species within a combined area of less than 2000 square miles. 

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